A nonprofit program of Community Environmental Center.

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Queens Reuse Center

3-17 26th Ave. Astoria, NY
718-777-0132
queens@bignyc.org

Brooklyn Reuse Center

69 9th St. Gowanus, NY
718-725-8925
brooklyn@bignyc.org

Open Everyday!

Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
& Sat-Sun 10am-5pm

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@builditgreen_nyc
#builditgreen

Donate, don't dump!

In 2013, BIG!NYC diverted over 4,000,000 lbs of usable building materials from the landfill!

BIG! Compost

has diverted 267,230 lbs of food scraps and given away 159,240 lbs of compost and 49,620 lbs of mulch in 2013.

BIG!Gives Back

has given away $300,000 worth of materials benefiting NYC's community and environment.

Our diversion rate reduces climate change emission by 3,200 MTCOE which is like saving 360,000 gallons of gasoline.

BIG!Blooms

has given away 5,345 pieces of retired lumber to build 2,226 garden beds in over 1,269 community and school gardens.

Reclaiming a Community Garden

Starting its life as an unused plot of land donated by a local Jewish school, Glendale Community Garden has expanded to a thriving project for local Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and children from nearby schools. Everything from the location to the dirt in the planters has been donated, including the four raised beds built with lumber from BIG!NYC’s donation program, BIGBlooms.

The people at GCC believe strongly in managing the garden with as little disruption as possible. To improve the soil quality, they’ve planted cover crops to condition the dirt for the next harvest and keep the soil healthy. Choosing to stay away from chemical fertilizers or pesticides, they built their own compost tumblers for weeds and compost scraps and instituted a careful crop rotation plan to reduce the need for any artificial additives. The perimeter of the property is lined with roses, shrubs, and flowers, and residents expect it to only flourish from here—especially with the recent addition of lumber from BIG!NYC. They envision a reclaimed window greenhouse, an arbor, and a sitting area for the community in the years to come to transform what was once a weedy, rocky plot of soil into a thriving grassroots garden.